NorthGowerWindTurbines

June 16, 2011

Eaglewatch: corporations invading communities

This report from native news watch group Eaglewatch, June 16, 2011:

From the Eagle Watch #154

Mining the Wind:  Who Would’ve Thunk It??
Detailed Report
June 16, 2011

In the early days after Contact, we Indigenous were shocked when the Colonizers wanted to sell the land from under us.  We objected vigourously.  To us Real and Original People/Nishnaabe/Ongwehonweh, the land contains the bones and dust of our ancestors.  It is not to be sold but the Newcomers sold it anyway.  Then they wanted to sell the water.  We were shocked and we objected.  We continue to object but they are doing it anyway.  Now they want to sell the wind.  We were shocked and now we are objecting.  Who would’ve ever thought the wind would become such an issue?

Over the past few weeks, we at the Eagle Watch, have scoured the internet for information on industrial wind turbines.  There’s lots out there and quite a growing debate. 

We profiled two wind developers, Prowind and Horizon Wind Inc, both of whom want to set up wind “farms” in Ontario.  What a misnomer!  It’s more like mining with all the associated damage and pollution.

There are many other big wind developers but these two are typical.

TWO CORPORATIONS INVADE TWO COMMUNITIES

With growing opposition to wind turbines being placed near people’s dwellings, the promoters will be looking for more places to put them in the bush, that is on Indigenous communities.  Watch out for that term, “remote location”.  It usually means dumping their toxic and wasteful projects on our land, on our doorstep, in our face.  They don’t care how it harms us.  They presume to act with impunity because they get away with it all the time.

Two well known environmental organizations, Greenpeace and the Sierra Club SUPPORT the mega wind projects.  Some people are surprised and outraged about this.  We have long been aware of the self-serving hypocrites who shelter under the banner of Environmentalists.  Many environmentalists support depopulation.

How much space does one wind turbine need?

“The GE 1.5-MW turbine, with a 70.5-m rotor span, therefore requires at least 48 acres per tower in a single line perpendicular to the wind (32 acres/MW) or 123 acres per tower in an array (82 acres/MW). Each Vestas V90 1.8-MW turbine, with a 90-m rotor, requires 78-200 acres (43-111 acres/MW). Tom Gray of the American Wind Energy Association has written, “My rule of thumb is 60 acres per megawatt for wind farms on land.”

Horizon aka Horizon Legacy Energy Corporation aka Horizon Wind Inc. aka Horizon Wind Limited Partnership and Big Thunder Windpark Inc., aka Big Thunder Windpark Limited Partnershp
 vs
Fort William First Nations and the City of Thunder Bay

Toronto based, private firm, Horizon Legacy Energy Corp. wants to put up about 20 wind turbines on the Fort William First Nation Nishnaabe territory pristine wilderness outside Thunder Bay Ontario, not far from the US border.   

The Fort William First Nations community is home to about 1500 people.  The colonial puppet Band Council signed an agreement in 2007 with Horizon Wind.  The Nishnaabe people were not informed.  They were not consulted and did not give their consent.

Thunder Bay already signed some deal with Horizon who are now sueing the city for $126million for reasons that are not clear.  Many Thunder Bay residents now vigourously oppose the wind project.

Horizon president and CEO Anthony Zwig was in for a real surprise on May 30, 2011 when the Fort William Nishnaabe filled their community hall to oppose the destructive wind project.  They had a lot of questions for Tony and they had plenty to say to him.

On June 1, a letter written by a Fort William Nishnaabe appeared in the NetNewsLedger.  In part, it reads:
“We, the Anishinabek peoples of Fort William First Nation, have had most of our lands and much of our way of life taken from us by settler society. Indeed, more than 8,600 acres of land has been taken by settler society for settler projects since we established our reserve.  We are literally surrounded by lands that have been destroyed by settler projects. Because of this, we live with all the problems consistent with colonial oppression, including social, psychological, environmental and political pathologies. Due to this legacy, WE WILL NOT GIVE ANOTHER INCH.

“The proposed location for the Big Thunder Wind Park is in prime moose habitat. Our reliance on moose for physical and spiritual sustenance depends on healthy moose habitat surrounding Loch Lomond lake. We have seen time and again that settler projects that meet provincial and/or federal standards do little to protect our sacred relationship to moose and other animals. We gain our identity from relationships to our lands and our animal relatives; though this relationship is hard for settler society to understand, we are ready to protect it. We will not let another settler project compromise moose habitat in our traditional territory…”

Tony “Huff and Puff” Zwig is a prominent and affluent Toronto … philanthropist and patron of the arts just like Murray Koffler, founder of Shoppers Drug Mart and the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business CCAB.  Tony and Walter Zwig and Murray and Tom Koffler are lifetime members of the board of governors at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. 
 
The Nor’Wester Mountain Escarpment Protection Committee opposes Horizon’s Big Thunder wind project in and near Thunder Bay.  They will be hosting a screening of the film, Windfall on Thursday June 23, 2011 at the Community Auditorium in Thunder Bay.

Another concern to the Fort William Nishnaabe is a company called Sky Power putting in a 45,000 panel solar installation on Fort William territory.  The scale of such a project is also detrimental to wildlife and people who depend on our relations for survival.

Prowind vs North Gower, Carleton Place, Brinston, South Dundas Township, United Counties of Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry, Shanly, Township of Edwardsburg-Cardinal, United Counties of Leeds & Grenville.

These settler communities are all on Ongwehonweh territory between the Ottawa and St. Lawrence Rivers.  Once productive farmland for early settlers, the family farm today is an “endangered species”.  Farmers struggle to earn a living from the soil.

Prowind is a German company with a Canadian subsidiary now based in Hamilton, Ontario.  Prowind has 16 wind projects all over Germany and is now expanding into at least 8 other countries.  This includes England, Ireland, Italy, France, Australia and Romania. 

Johannes Busmann, a certified dairy farmer and lawyer, founded Prowind in 2000.  He knows how to talk to farmers.  Prowind Canada is run by money-loving Cathy Weston, president and Juan K. Anderson, project manager and aerospace engineer.  Prowind likes to start the project and then sell it to someone more willing to deal with the headaches.

A North Gower farmer agreed to rent his land to Prowind for some wind turbines.  Now, Prowind wants to sell the project to him.  Prowind is trying to develop other wind projects in the area.

The resistance to the Prowind wind turbine installations is organized under the name, North Gower Wind Action Group (NGWAG) which is related to Wind Concerns Ontario.  These people are concerned about quality of life and how wind turbines affect property values.  NGWAG is hosting the screening of Windfall on June 26 in North Gower, about 20 minutes outside Ottawa.

THE PROBLEM WITH WIND TURBINES
The big wind projects cause a number of problems.  Here’s our short list of things we learned and then some more details about the related health issues.

1.  Wind turbines are extremely ugly to look at.  We think that Beauty should be a part of our Lifestyle.  Wind turbines also cause strobing, flickering and reflection of sunlight that is a health issue for some people.  The wind turbines being built keep getting bigger and bigger.

2.  Wind turbines make hideous noise, often loud and steady like a speeding train that never arrives.  It’s hard on the nerves literally.  Wind turbines make infrasound which the human ear cannot hear but the body feels it.  People like airline pilots already get vibro-acoustic disease (VAD) from constant exposure to low frequency sound. Wind turbines emit electromagnetic radiation of various frequencies that can be harmful to health on a cellular level.

3.  As more and more farmland is being used for wind turbines, developers are turning to the bush.  They want to cut down trees and build more roads.  Wind turbines need regular maintenance so they must be easily accessible.  This is destructive to all the creatures and Life in the bush.  It is murderous to Indigenous people who get their livelihood from the bush.

4.  Wind turbines adversely affect birds, bats and other creatures.  The wind turbines on Wolfe Island and those proposed for nearby Amherst Island are located on the migratory routes of many threatened and endangered bird species including raptors like the Bald Eagle.  The presence of the turbines causes the birds to avoid these locations where they normally find food.  The Kingston Field Naturalists are studying this issue.

5.  There are potential dangers of chunks of ice falling from wind turbines or being flung great distances by the rotors.  Anyone could get hit.  Fires are also possible and have happened.  The wind turbines contain plastics, resins and other substances that are very toxic when burned.

6.  The promoters of wind turbines always tell you they can power so many homes and produce so many mega watts.  But do they?   Wind is not a constant so it is impossible to predict how much wind will occur during any given time frame.   Just how efficient are the turbines at harnessing the wind’s energy?  A simple fact of physics is that when electrictiy is produced in one place and transmitted to another place, it loses power in the transmission. 

7.  There are security and communications concerns that the wind turbines interfere with microwave transmission and radar including at airports.  Why then this big industrial wind turbine facility going up at Kingston Ontario, the east end of Lake Ontario near to the busy Canadian air force base and international airport, Trenton, less than an hour’s drive to the west???

8.  Proponents claim that industrial wind projects will provide jobs.  Beyond the construction, this does not appear to be true at all.  A minimal number of technicians and mechanics maintain the turbines once in place.

9.  In the end, the wind turbines with so many moving parts will break down into useless garbage in about 20 to 25 years.  The steel rubble will lie with the crumbling concrete pads, motionless and quiet at last.  The emboldened animals will creep forward to examine the debris.  Plants will pop up and vines will creep over the miles of wires, batteries, broken switches and plastic shards.  People will shake their heads, amazed at how foolish their fellow humans can be.

For news of North Gower-Richmond, please go to http://northgowerwindactiongroup.wordpress.com

March 22, 2011

Haldimand Council carries resolution for moratorium on wind turbines

A Mayor with courage and integrity:

Haldimand Council carries resolution for moratorium on wind turbines.

March 10, 2011

North Gower resident writes a letter

One of the questions we are asked is, how do you know that your community group represents a wider view from the community? Well, aside from the several hundred people who signed the petition that went to the Ontario legislature via MPP Lisa MacLeod, and the 300+ families on our e-mail list, and the 125+ people who come to our information meetings, the countless volunteers working daily on this issue, I guess we don’t know what everyone is thinking.

In the Smith’s Falls EMC today is a letter to the editor from a North Gower resident. She writes:

Dear Editor:

I wish to volunteer my two cents into what is becoming an endlessly revolving argument about the wind turbine farms.

First off, not all of us in the North Gower area are against the Wind Turbine project being proposed for this area. I know from personal experience that wind turbines can perform well here. That being said, if viable scientific evidence can be established into the ill effects of this type of farm, then certainly additional precautions should be implemented – whether it be an increased setback from homes, or possibly smaller or fewer of the turbines.

The Ontario government has illustrated that it can change its mind if such evidence comes to light, as shown by the recent hold on the installation of off-shore wind turbines.

I certainly don’t think that this means that the whole concept or use of wind turbines should be scrapped – this would be extremely short sighted behaviour, given that we do need to stop relying on non-renewable resources for our hydro and energy.

Now is the time to be developing alternative energies to sustain our power requirements – when we can take the time to do it properly, and improve on them.

Debbie Gervais

North Gower

We’re not sure where this resident lives in relation to the proposed industrial wind development, and neither can we know how informed she is, but she has a few facts wrong:

-there is already valid scientific evidence that if the turbines are located too close to people’s homes, people can experience sleep deprivation and then ill health effects

-the Ontario government is standing firm that its 550-meter setback is “safe” despite evidence from around the world in countries that already have turbines, that a setback of 1-2 km is better (note that other countries such as Germany have setbacks between zones, not between the base of a turbine and the centre of a house, as Ontario does). The truth is, the 550-meters is more about geography than health: if we had a 1 km setback, there would be NO turbines in southern and eastern Ontario because of the way the roads and concessions are laid out.

-a proper scientific study is needed to have an evidence-based setback. Ontario now has such a research project ongoing, but it is headed by an expert in electrical engineering, and they plan to take 5 years to come to a conclusion. Ontario will be long done with populating its rural areas with turbines by then.

-industrial wind turbines are a flawed technology–they are intermittent and require fossil-fuel back-up; this is why Ontario is also building natural gas-fired power plants at the same time as it is encouraging wind power development.

-we’re not sure what the “personal experience” with wind turbines would be in this area, given that the Canada Wind Atlas states the area is “poor” to “marginal” for a wind resource. Since we don’t have any industrial-scale turbines here, her experience would have to be with a small wind mill. THAT, i.e., small scale, is an appropriate use of wind power development, NOT 626-foot industrial towers.

-this is industrialization of a rural community that, because of the Green Energy Act, is not getting to have its say. What it could do to property values is expropriation without compensation.

Last, of course everyone wants a clean and effective power system in Ontario. But wind doesn’t work. We don’t see why the people of North Gower have to participate in an experiment that will see no benefits to our community and which is really all about profits going to an offshore corporate developer. “Take the time and do it properly”? WE AGREE!!!!

And, we’re not alone: dozens of Ontario communities have now passed resolutions or motions objecting to industrial wind turbine projects and asking for their planning powers to be returned, AND for independent health studies.

northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

View of turbines at Melancthon, near Orangeville, Ontario.

December 4, 2010

The “green collapse”

Energy Probe Executive Director Lawrence Solomon writes in today’s National Post that countries arround the world are turning their backs on expensive and unproductive wind and solar power generation. And, he says, Ontario is next.

Countries that adopted an “extreme green” outlook are now realizing that so-called “renewable” power is leading to financial disaster. They have “recently swallowed their pride, slashed their subsidies and backstabbed their renewables industries.” He cites Spain, German, France and Australia as all taking dramatic steps to avoid financial ruin.

As for Ontario, the province will have no choice but to follow suit. Right now, Ontario electricity consumers are experiencing rate hikes “50 times greater than those countenanced in some U.S. jursidictions.” The provincial regulator was “neutered” by the Ontario government, he says and is now unable to protect consumers.

“Following public protests, and in advance of an election in which power prices are expected to loom large, one major natural gas plant–needed to back up wind turbines– was recently cancelled. Other natural gas plants, again opposed by the public, may likewise fall. The wind farms that require such backups, and which are themselves opposed by dozens of community groups and their local governments, could be next in this house of cards.”

Well, we hope so. It is bad enough to watch our communities be industrialized and destroyed, the health of our residents threatened, but it is quite another to watch once strong and wealthy Ontario being sent over a waterfall in this very rickety boat.

It’s time for the truth about wind. The corporate wind developers, at whose hands financial crisis is being meted out all over the world, won’t tell the truth, but thank goodness there are many commentators like Solomon who will.

The whole article may be found here: http://opinion.financialpost.com/2010/12/03/lawrence-solomon-green-collapse/

October 14, 2010

Industrial wind turbines: impractical, unreliable, expensive “blight”

From today’s Arnprior EMC, a broader look at Ontario’s power situation. Note North Gower in paragraph 9.

When will common sense catch on?

Common sense needed to remedy hydro situation

Posted Oct 14, 2010 By Jeff Maguire


EMC News – The natives are restless and it appears Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and the governing Liberal party is slowly waking up to that fact.

The rapid rise in electricity costs for consumers in this province has finally burst the Grits’ bubble.

We are told by the so-called “experts” that the current government is simply passing along hydro rate increases that should have been implemented years ago.

Years of mismanagement has left Ontario’s electricity system in structural and financial chaos. The more recent decision by the McGuinty Liberals to close coal-fired plants to suit their “green” agenda has simply exacerbated an already bad situation.

Now Ontarians are feeling the pinch and frankly conservation isn’t the answer. Most people I know are doing their level best to reduce their use of electricity. But with delivery charges and other “historic” issues the main reason for the cost increases, cutting back won’t do much to assist individual customers.

To make matters much worse, instead of revisiting the matter of traditional electrical generating methods – coal-fired and nuclear power – this government is intent on furthering their green objectives.

Wind and solar energy are “best sellers” in terms of winning votes – or at least the Liberals evidently feel they are because they have been working hard to sell both methods of electrical generation to Ontarians.

For example, wind turbines are becoming a more common site in North America. They’ve been used in wind blown places like the California desert for a long time but are now making their way into the eastern United States, Canada and Ontario.

Wherever turbines are due to be installed, controversy quickly follows. Witness the much maligned installation on Wolfe Island near Kingston. Or a planned “wind farm” near North Gower in rural, south Ottawa.

They are gigantic devices with massive blades which have upset residents who live close to such installations. Many say they are “a blight on the landscape” and there is also some evidence of health problems related to exposure to the waves of energy transmitted from these huge, whirling machines.

Solar farms are somewhat more passive and placed on scrub land, that isn’t much use for farming, they seem harmless enough. The Ontario government is encouraging people to install solar panels on their homes and property. They are even soliciting excess power from large-scale solar developments on private land, in hopes of adding the electricity to the provincial grid.

You might even be able to pay your mortgage, or better, by installing the panels and selling power to the province make a little on the side as well.

I know some people who are “off the grid” because they chose to go solar and install batteries which store the excess energy generated by the sun. Those I have spoken to couldn’t be happier. They aren’t saddled with the sudden increase in hydro payments most of us are.

But is this practical for the majority of people? And more importantly, is electricity generated by solar and wind cost-efficient on a larger scale?

Judging by virtually everything I have read on this subject – and I have read a great deal – there are big questions about that.

On a larger scale solar energy is big business for some companies who are seeking sites across Eastern Ontario and across Canada.

The initial cost of installing solar panels is expensive although some are clearly willing to try it in hopes of saving money and perhaps even generating income.

As for wind power, large scale developments can only be established after months and years of lobbying and hard work by large companies. Gaining approval isn’t easy as we have seen in our own province recently. People, especially neighbours, are skeptical and highly resistant, partly due to unknown factors such as the potential for damaging the health of individuals.

We have also spoken to many people in Europe, particularly the United Kingdom, about wind turbines which are in extensive use there and have been for many years.

Most we have spoken to give them an immediate thumbs down. People in Britain are tired of seeing turbines spring up on so many pieces of vacant land, or standing like behemoths on the horizon, seemingly everywhere.

One of the largest such developments in Europe is planned for the estuary of the River Thames, on the east coast of England. In fact wind farms located in shallow waters, just offshore, are common in Great Britain. And for my money they are ugly!

Outside of aesthetics, the argument against turbines is simple. They add very little to the electrical generating capacity of the countries where they are now commonplace. In Britain for example wind turbines contribute less than three per cent of the electricity which flows into the national grid. And remember, there are thousands of these giant beasts everywhere!

At first blush we weren’t offended by the sight of turbines. We first saw them in wind-swept Cornwall, England in the mid 1990s.

Now my wife and I are tired of the things. They are everywhere in the UK. We just saw a huge development in rural Scotland in August which, from our point of view, scarred an otherwise tranquil and beautiful landscape.

We don’t look forward to seeing that situation develop in our country or worse still in our own backyard.

I have written previously about the large wind farm which sprang up at Brainardsville, New York in the Adirondacks, not far from Malone, a couple of years ago.

At first it was a curiosity to see turbines in this beautiful part of upper New York State. Now we detest the sight of the things when we drive through that part of the northeastern U.S. If we lived there we would be among the many who are lobbying against the things and there is an intense effort to have them removed from what I have read.

In Britain coal-fired electrical generation has gained traction once again because of improvements in how efficiently coal can now be burned. In recent times modern methods have dramatically reduced emissions and made coal a more practical means of producing power.

Obviously nuclear is a much vilified means of electrical production. There are obvious safety considerations involved and therefore many people are scared of it.

Nuclear power generation has to be respected, but in real terms there have been relatively few serious accidents – thank goodness. Of course another Chernobyl is always a possibility and makes us shy away from using a powerful method of generating power.

I am an advocate of taking a fresh look at coal-fired plants, especially given modern science and especially considering the dilemma we so clearly face in this province and this country.

We have to do something and coal-fired is probably the fastest and safest way to improve our electrical generating capacity in heavily populated Ontario, not to mention the rest of Canada.

As for the Ontario government, the increasing stream of letters to the editor in newspapers these days has to be viewed as another setback for an administration which is coming under increasing fire over its electricity-related programs and policies.

Smart meters, skyrocketing delivery charges, along with such things as regulatory and debt retirement charges already had hydro customers in Ontario reeling. Then, on July 1, the McGuinty government introduced the hated Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) and promptly added that to our electrical bills.

It is all too much for most of us and some people have clearly been pushed over the edge by this unexpected, added expense. The complaints have reached tidal wave proportions, so much so that the premier has announced his administration will look at ways of cutting the costs for seniors and low-income earners who, obviously, are among the hardest hit.

What about the rest of us? We don’t want these higher costs either. I don’t know anyone who does.

With a provincial election now just one year away the polls show support for the Liberals dropping like a stone in water. The Progressive Conservatives, despite their own organizational issues, have benefited massively.

The cry “anyone but McGuinty” is rising in crescendo and is giving the opposition parties in Ontario renewed hope and growing confidence.

It is time for practicalities and common sense to push aside the green lobby and get Ontario back on track in this important department.

If you have any comments or questions for Jeff Maguire, he can be reached by e-mail at: jeffrey.maguire@rogers.com

August 4, 2010

Sticks and stones: but the truth will never go away

All we can say is, we must be getting somewhere, in our quest to explore and communicate a wider field of information about industrial scale wind power than is coming from the corporate wind lobby and the Ontario government. Why? Because the people who are in this for the money (they don’t care about the environment) or for the political power (they don’t care about the environment, either) continue to throw insults at those who haven’t bought their story about industrial wind turbines. They want to make people–typically from rural areas–look petty and small-minded. Uninformed, even.

From Prowind’s Bart Geleynse Jr claiming on a radio interview that people aren’t really getting sick from the noise and vibration from industrial wind turbines (they’re just an “annoyance” he said and anyway, “People are dying from coal!!”) to his statement that the North Gower Wind Action Group was an “activist minority”, and now the Toronto Star claiming that people critical of wind energy are “a small but vocal group,” the corporate wind lobby and its friends keep trotting out the insults and demeaning comments.

Well, we say, you can say what you like, but we’re persisting. And we’re not so small now, either, with over 40 municipalities in Ontario now passing bylaws/motions/resolutions. And citizens’ groups around the world getting the message out. Which is simply this: wind power doesn’t work. The only reason this phenomenon is occurring at all is outrageous government subsidies to the industry. AND industrial scale wind turbines do cause health effects for their involuntary neighbours. Simple, objective, properly carried out health studies are needed to confirm safe setbacks between homes and industrial turbine installations, but as Dr Carl Phillips says, the people who have the resources (i.e., the wind industry), don’t want to do it.

A similar situation is unfolding in Alberta where people living near oil development are experiencing a very unpleasant smell and the presence of volatile organic compounds in the air. People and animals are getting sick and the stuff is so thick that Windex won’t remove it from the windows…but there’s nothing wrong. Industry response? “There’s a certain type of hysteria that builds around these areas,” said Darin Barter of the Energy Resources Conservation Board in an interview with The Globe and Mail (“An omen or a fluke?” July 24, 2010). But those people near Three Creeks Alberta are fighting on.

As we will.

For more news daily, go to http://windconcernsontario.wordpress.com

and to contact the North Gower Wind Action Group, visit http://northgowerwindactiongroup.wordpress.com and email northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

August 3, 2010

Organized nursing eats the Pablum

The Registered Nurses Association of Ontario, according to today’s Toronto Star, is participating in activities to “help dispel the health fears being generated by a small but vocal group of wind critics.” They are working with the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment (CAPE), an organization that has an altruistic-sounding name but which in fact has Gideon Forman as its spokesperson, who is clearly aligned with the corporate wind development lobby.

The Star article refers to the Canadian Wind Energy Association-funded “survey” which is supposed to show that a “vast majority” or none out of ten Ontarians support wind energy. Never mind that the survey was of just 1,300 people in a province of 13 million, and that few of those surveyed had much awareness of industrial wind turbines at all. (But still, when asked what the negative aspects of wind turbines were, the number one was “noise”.)

In the story, every nonsensical scare tactic is trotted out such as the notorious “coal is killing people” (even though this notion has been thoroughly debunked…and while it is true that coal could be cleaner, why not use technology to do that, rather than build multi-billion-dollar wind developments that harm people’s health in a new way?), and that industrial scale wind power is “clean and renewable.”

For the nurses’s association to fall in with the corporate wind developers in spite of all the evidence, if not to the contrary at least calling into question the safety of industrial wind turbine developments (we know they have it–the North Gower Wind Action Group has been working with them for months), is absolutely appalling.

And for the Star to have given any credence whatsoever to such an insignificant and deeply flawed, clearly manipulative “survey” (usually the media does not publish the results of online surveys as they are completely unreliable and not verifiable) is also appalling. They did note that the survey never asked people how they would feel about a wind turbine being located “next door” but then went on to repeat every industry-formulated spoonful of Pablum possible.

The wind industry is not about saving anybody’s lives or making the health of Ontarians better: it’s about making money, and nothing else. It’s hardly surprising then that they would use their considerable financial resources to shore up support; what is remarkable though is that this “small but vocal group” must be having some effect for them to keep on reaching into their bag of dirty tricks.

For more news daily, go to http://windconcernsontario.wordpress.com

and for North Gower Wind Action Group, http://northgowerwindactiongroup.wordpress.com or email northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

April 14, 2010

The trials of people living near wind turbines

Her stories may be “anecdotal” but they are compelling: Long Point, Ont. resident Stephana Johnston drove six hours to North Gower yesterday to tell her story at a public information meeting organized by the North Gower Wind Action Group.

Within days when the 18 turbines that surround her house began operating, Johnston began to experience health problems she didn’t have before: ringining in the ears, anxiety, a strange feeling in her head, and an inability to sleep due to the turbine noise and vibration. Her neighbours began sharing their stories too. A close neighbour who was always a “health nut” Johnston said, became unwell, suffering frequent headaches.

“I don’t want your community have happen what happened to us,” she said.

The CBC’s Steve Fischer interviewed Prowind’s Bart Geleynse prior to the North Gower meeting (he claims he wasn’t allowed to attend which isn’t true) and Geleynse said turbine neighbours’ complaints are merely “psychosomatic… largely based on emotion… a reaction to something new.”

Geleynse, who has no medical training whatsoever and is merely a salesperson for German-based Prowind, also claimed that the opinion of the majority of the medical community was that there is no substance to the reports of ill health. This is patently untrue as medical reports are mounting monthly. When Dr Michael Nissenbaum’s Mars Hill report comes out, according to Carmen Krogh who also spoke at the North Gower meeting, the results will show that the vast majority (in this case 81%) of people exposed to turbines have health effects.

Stephana Johnston said, “You won’t find anyone who is in the wind industry living next to 18 turbines.”

There are links to health-related documents on our documents page.

For more international scientific evidence, go to http://www.windvigilance.com

For more on North Gower in specific, go to http://northgowerwindactiongroup.wordpress.com

March 13, 2010

Meeting announced

The North Gower Wind Action Group has announced its public information meeting on the potential effects of industrial wind turbines. Speakers coming from all over Ontario to this special event:

Dr Robert McMurtry, professor emeritus of medicine, University of Western Ontario, speaking on health effects
Dr John Harrison, professor of physics, Queens University, speaking on noise and vibration
Stephana Johnston, an Essex County resident who is living in the midst of 18 industrial wind turbines, telling her story
Chris Luxemberger, realtor and president of the Brampton Real Estate Board, on the effects on property values, based on his study of properties near wind turbines in the Shelburne-Amaranth-Melancthon area
and pharmacist Carmen Krogh, who will share the results of her research and experiences with wind turbines.
April 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the Alfred Taylor Centre in North Gower.

February 18, 2010

North Gower Wind Action Group

Filed under: Uncategorized — ottawawindconcerns @ 1:18 pm
Tags: ,

Please note that this is *not* the blog for the North Gower Wind Action Group. That is at:

http://northgowerwindactiongroup.wordpress.com

Their (new) email address is northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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